plant-powered pizza crust (vegan, gluten free)

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Finally! I feel like I can enjoy pizza again.

Since changing my diet to a plant-based one, I also found myself losing my desire to eat wheat-based foods. I experimented with a few pizza crust recipes, including a cauliflower one, but hadn’t found one that I really loved until now.

This pizza crust is mostly potato, a little bit of cauliflower and can be made with a gluten-free flour of your choice…I prefer brown rice flour. It’s chewy and crusty and holds up well under all the toppings. I could seriously eat them as is.

I prefer to make these as indiviual mini-pizza servings…perfect for customizing them to suit any palette. My favorite no-fuss toppings included regular hummus, pizza sauce, onion, jalepeno peppers and basil. They also freeze well, so make a stack and save some for when you need a quick lunch or are on the go.

Plant-powered Pizza Crust

1 1/2 cups finely diced potatoes
1/2 cup finely diced cauliflower
1/2-3/4 cups gluten-free flour of choice
3 T ground flax seed
1/4-1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp salt

Bring 1-2″ of water to boil in a medium saucepan, then add potatoes and cauliflower. Boil until veggies are very tender and the water has evaporated (this way, you don’t loose the nutrients in the water!). Mash well or blend in a food processor until smooth and cool. Add remaining ingredients, starting with a 1/2 cup of flour and adding more as needed. Knead in the flour with your hands until it becomes a firm, but sticky dough. For into a 5-7 balls, place on a cookie sheet lightly greased with avocado oil and flatten into round pizza crust shapes. Place in a 375o oven and pre-bake for 12-15 minutes. Add toppings and bake for another 10-12 minutes. Freeze any leftovers by placing on cookie sheets and popping in the freezer. Once frozen, store in airtight freezer containers or bags.

brussels sprout & “bacon” pizza (vegan)

2009-01-01 14.13.33The weather finally is whispering spring. My children actually want to play outside. I wore shoes, not boots, outside for the first time since I can’t remember when (not counting my time in the DR). Today the boys rode their bikes to school. Yet I know we’re not in the clear yet…a spring snow is still a possibility.

And here is a, perhaps unconventional, recipe; a nod to this betwixt and between time of eating winter’s comfort food while looking forward to spring’s fresh raw green. It’s a pizza featuring the warming heat of peppers and topped with raw Brussels sprouts and coconut bacon.

Considering I spent much of my life convinced I did. not. like. Brussels sprouts (I even tried convincing my mum I was allergic to them), I find it humorous that I now try to find ways to work them into a recipe. Though I still am not a fan of a cooked sprout, I do enjoy them in the raw.

If you enjoy the taste and texture of cooked Brussels sprouts, by all means roast away, but I like the contrast of warm pizza with cool greens and knowing that the heat hasn’t killed all their micro-nutrient goodness.

The coconut bacon recipe comes from a recipe pack Angela at Oh She Glows offered with a pre-buy of her cookbook*; I tweaked it slightly. brusselsproutbaconpizza

CLICK HERE TO PRINT A PDF of the brussels sprout & “bacon” pizza recipe

CLICK HERE TO PRINT A PDF of the coconut bacon recipe

Brussels sprout & “bacon” pizza (vegan)

Prep Time: 10-15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Serving size: 2 adults

 

Ingredients

For the Coconut Bacon (makes more than needed for the pizza – save the extra for other recipes!)

  • 2 cups large, flaked coconut, unsweetened
  • 3 T coconut aminos
  • 2 tsp. liquid smoke
  • ½ tsp. pure maple syrup
  • ¼ tsp salt

For the Pizza

  • Pizza crust (here’s the one I use)
  • Hummus
  • Pizza sauce (the sauce I make for this)
  • Pine nuts (optional)
  • Sliced onion rounds
  • Sliced red peppers, organic are best
  • Sliced Greek pepperoncini
  • Brussels sprouts, roughly chopped
  • Coconut bacon (recipe follows, next page)
  • Garlic powder & dried oregano

Instructions

for the Coconut Bacon

  1. Add all ingredients to a bowl and stir to combine. Mixing by hand can help the liquids coat the coconut.
  2. Let the mixture stand a few minutes while oven preheats to further aid absorption.
  3. Spread coconut onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  4. Bake 7-8 minutes, remove pan from oven, stir, then return pan oven.
  5. Bake an additional 7-8 minutes, stirring once or twice to help coconut bacon cook evenly.
  6. Remove from oven and let cool.

for the Brussels Sprout & “Bacon” Pizza

  1. If using a homemade crust, pre-bake it for five minutes.
  2. Spread on hummus, then sauce.
  3. Sprinkle garlic powder and dried oregano, then add pine nuts if using.
  4. Add onions, peppers and pepperoncini and bake in over for about 15 minutes or until crust is lightly brown and veggies are tender.
  5. Top with raw Brussels sprouts and sprinkle on coconut bacon. Serve.

Recipe Notes

  • You can use tamari or soy sauce in place of coconut aminos, but you will need to adjust the salt content. I like using coconut aminos because it is free of additives often found in soy sauce and tamari and it has a lower sodium content. Here’s where I order it on vitacost.com.
  • I use Wright’s Hickory Liquid Smoke because it is one of the few liquid smoke brands that is free of sugar and other additives.
  • Although the bacon is soft when it first comes out of the oven, it hardens as it cools.
  • I like using red pepper hummus (especially Sabra’s Red Pepper Hummus) for the extra flavor dimension it offers, but feel free to experiment with your favorite kind. Hummus is key as it mimics the moisture and flavor cheese adds to pizza.
  • I use Jeff’s Naturals brand for my pepperoncini because it doesn’t contain the preservatives found in most brands of pepperoncini found in grocery stores. I get mine a natural foods grocery store.
  • Sprinkling on garlic powder and dried oregano helps boost flavor.
  • To judge quantity, I make my pizza in a 9-inch cake pan and use about ½ onion, one small red pepper, ½ cup of pepperoncini, 4-5 Brussels sprouts and ¼ cup coconut bacon. But feel free to adjust to your personal taste.
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* *I am an Amazon associate. If you purchase the cookbook through this link, it will provide a small credit to my account.

whole grain pizza dough (reduced gluten)

pizza dough

When my children were little, we discovered this book at the library. It included a recipe for pizza dough in the back and we decided to give it a try.

Friday pizza nights with the “Pizza for Everyone” crust quickly became a family tradition, one that was often accompanied by a movie. Though we don’t strictly adhere to this tradition all the time, I usually plan for pizza night once a week (and make a few extra personal pizzas to tuck into school lunches).

I’ve adapted the original recipe to include whole grains and reduce the gluten content. I’m also sharing a second version of the dough strictly as a printable PDF. This second version uses a 2:1:1 ratio of unbleached, all-purpose white flour to whole wheat pastry flour to brown rice flour because it’s hard to sell my husband and children on the crust I prefer to eat.

A single batch of this dough yields two 9-inch pizzas and I can get a double batch of the dough to make one large thin crust pizza on a cookie sheet, plus 3-4 small personal pizzas. The dough also freezes well, so when I make my version of the crust, I split it in half, popping half of it in the freezer and turning the other half into dinner.

CLICK HERE TO PRINT A PDF of the reduced gluten + whole grain pizza dough recipe

CLICK HERE TO PRINT A PDF of the refined + whole grain flour pizza dough recipe

 reduced gluten whole grain pizza dough

Prep Time: 75-105 minutes (includes rise time)

Cook Time: 20-25 minutes

 

Ingredients

  • 1 7g. package dry, active yeast
  • Drizzle of sweetener of your choice
  • ¾ c. warm water (105-110 degrees F)
  • 1 c. whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 c. brown rice flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1/8 c. olive or avocado oil

Instructions

Gently stir yeast and sweetener in a bowl with the warm water until combined.

Let the mixture stand until bubbles begin to form (a.k.a proofing the yeast). This takes about five minutes.

Stir in olive oil, then mix in flour and salt.

Knead 3-5 minutes until dough is smooth and pliable.

Form into a ball in the bowl, cover with a damp towel and let rise in a warm spot for 60-90 minutes.

On a lightly oiled pan, press dough into desired size and shape, then pre-bake in a 350 degree F oven for 5 minutes to set the top of the crust.

Add desired toppings and cook an additional 15-20 minutes.

Recipe Notes

The right water temperature for the water is key to a good dough…too cold and the yeast takes a long time to work, too hot and you kill it completely. If this is your first time working with yeast, you might want to try using a thermometer to get the right water temp.

Avocado oil is a better choice for foods cooked at medium-high temperatures like pizza because it can withstand high heat.

If you are saving some of the dough for future use, wrap it in a couple of plastic bags and store it in the freezer. You can do this before or after pre-baking it, but I found freezing it in raw dough form to better.

Feel free to experiment with your own combination of flours, though texture and results may vary.

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marinara sauce for pasta or pizza, oil & sugar free

100_0929For the longest time I could not bring myself to eat pasta with sauce on it.  Chalk it up to getting the flu after eating spaghetti for dinner. Instead, I requested my spaghetti be served with Italian Salad Dressing.

Years went by until I worked up the nerve to start eating pasta with a little bit of sauce, but it wasn’t until I went to Venice, Italy as a senior in high school that I finally understood why people love pasta.

I started making my own sauce a few years ago when I switched to eating vegan and also cutting back on oils (most store bought sauces contain oil and many also contain sugar). The inspiration for this recipe comes from the Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease book which also inspired my change in diet.

Since we are a family of six and this sauce freezes well, I make a large quantity. That way, I only need to prepare this about once a month. It makes enough to fill about five large mason jars plus a few smaller jars for pizza sauce.

When I don’t have tomatoes on hand from my garden, my favorite brand of canned tomatoes are Muir Glen’s organic diced or whole tomatoes because 1. they’re organic and 2. Muir Glen took the BPA out of their can lining. Thankfully, I can buy these in bulk at BJs to save money.

marinara sauce collage

CLICK HERE TO PRINT A PDF of the marinara sauce recipe

oil & sugar free marinara sauce for pasta or pizza

Prep Time: 10-20 minutes

Cook Time: at least 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 medium-small onions, diced
  • 15-20 medium-large garlic cloves, minced
  • 5 28-oz. canned tomatoes
  • ½ c. fresh basil
  • 3 tsp. dried oregano
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • Dashes freshly ground black pepper
  • 1-2 6-oz cans tomato paste (optional)

Instructions

In a large stock pot, sauté onions and garlic with a little water to prevent the vegetables from sticking.

Meanwhile, in a blender or food processor, blend tomatoes in batches to desired sauce consistency.

Add blended tomatoes to stock pot along with other ingredients except the tomato paste.

Simmer at least 30 minutes or longer to let flavors develop.

For pizza sauce, set aside several cups of the pasta sauce and stir in tomato paste until thoroughly combined. Doing so in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat helps with this process.

Recipe Notes

I use Muir Glen’s organic whole or diced tomatoes and blend them to a fairly smooth consistency.

Garlic is the key to a tasty sauce, but if you’re not a big fan of garlic, start with a slightly smaller quantity.

This recipe makes a lot and it freezes well. One batch usually yields enough sauce for 3-4 pasta meals plus 3-4 pizzas.

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