5-ingredient walnut pesto over zucchini noodles (vegan, gluten free, paleo)

pesto

I am newer to the whole veggie noodle trend, mostly because I didn’t want to invest in a spiralizer unless I knew I would get frequent use out of it. For awhile, I made due by putting my dusty cheese grater to use to make zucchini noodle strips. And then I found this:

Only $5 at Whole Foods and I was sold. I was a little skeptical at first if it would really work, but it does! And not only does it turn out lovely long zucchini noodles, I get a few bonus rotini shapes too. The only downside is it’s hard to spiralize the entire veggie because you run the risk of nicking your fingers in to the bargain. A brief search on Amazon, however, located this one* that solves that problem and is still small enough to be tucked into a drawer.

While my traditional pasta sauce works well with these noodles, I think they were meant for this pesto recipe. You can serve it over slightly warmed noodles, or since the weather is heating up, eat it cold. This pesto is a snap to put together and it can even be frozen.

Five-ingredient walnut pestoIMG_4176
1.5 cups of basil
1/2 cups of walnuts
2 garlic cloves
1/8 tsp salt
dashes of freshly ground pepper
3/4 tsp nutritional yeast (optional)

Place all ingredients in a food processor or blender and mix on high until everything is thoroughly combined. Spoon onto noodles of choice (I recommend zucchini!) and stir until noodles are coated. Personally, for my own bowl, I like to mix in the pasta by hand. Store any extras in an air-tight jar in the freezer.

*makes enough for two adult servings

*contains an affiliate link

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whole grain pizza dough (reduced gluten)

pizza dough

When my children were little, we discovered this book at the library. It included a recipe for pizza dough in the back and we decided to give it a try.

Friday pizza nights with the “Pizza for Everyone” crust quickly became a family tradition, one that was often accompanied by a movie. Though we don’t strictly adhere to this tradition all the time, I usually plan for pizza night once a week (and make a few extra personal pizzas to tuck into school lunches).

I’ve adapted the original recipe to include whole grains and reduce the gluten content. I’m also sharing a second version of the dough strictly as a printable PDF. This second version uses a 2:1:1 ratio of unbleached, all-purpose white flour to whole wheat pastry flour to brown rice flour because it’s hard to sell my husband and children on the crust I prefer to eat.

A single batch of this dough yields two 9-inch pizzas and I can get a double batch of the dough to make one large thin crust pizza on a cookie sheet, plus 3-4 small personal pizzas. The dough also freezes well, so when I make my version of the crust, I split it in half, popping half of it in the freezer and turning the other half into dinner.

CLICK HERE TO PRINT A PDF of the reduced gluten + whole grain pizza dough recipe

CLICK HERE TO PRINT A PDF of the refined + whole grain flour pizza dough recipe

 reduced gluten whole grain pizza dough

Prep Time: 75-105 minutes (includes rise time)

Cook Time: 20-25 minutes

 

Ingredients

  • 1 7g. package dry, active yeast
  • Drizzle of sweetener of your choice
  • ¾ c. warm water (105-110 degrees F)
  • 1 c. whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 c. brown rice flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1/8 c. olive or avocado oil

Instructions

Gently stir yeast and sweetener in a bowl with the warm water until combined.

Let the mixture stand until bubbles begin to form (a.k.a proofing the yeast). This takes about five minutes.

Stir in olive oil, then mix in flour and salt.

Knead 3-5 minutes until dough is smooth and pliable.

Form into a ball in the bowl, cover with a damp towel and let rise in a warm spot for 60-90 minutes.

On a lightly oiled pan, press dough into desired size and shape, then pre-bake in a 350 degree F oven for 5 minutes to set the top of the crust.

Add desired toppings and cook an additional 15-20 minutes.

Recipe Notes

The right water temperature for the water is key to a good dough…too cold and the yeast takes a long time to work, too hot and you kill it completely. If this is your first time working with yeast, you might want to try using a thermometer to get the right water temp.

Avocado oil is a better choice for foods cooked at medium-high temperatures like pizza because it can withstand high heat.

If you are saving some of the dough for future use, wrap it in a couple of plastic bags and store it in the freezer. You can do this before or after pre-baking it, but I found freezing it in raw dough form to better.

Feel free to experiment with your own combination of flours, though texture and results may vary.

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